Now that things have cooled down, let’s take a look at public education in Arizona.

Public Education and the Law

Arizona’s Constitution, article 11, states:

 The legislature shall enact such laws as shall provide for the establishment and maintenance of a general and uniform public school system…

Funding Sources Overview

The first thing to know is that our current system of improperly funding (general and uniform) public education is costing “Joe Tax-Payer” a ton of money.  Schools, and other social services like roads and fire departments, have been cut at the state level to the point where local municipalities must raise taxes.  A few key points here:

  • Schools receive over $1 million more in funding annually from local funding than from the state.
  • AZ’s local taxes average 6th highest in the nation.
  • Of our local taxes collected in Arizona, almost 8% pays for interest (we’re in debt).

When comparing the balance of local money to state money between states in the southwest, Arizona is the only state with this disproportionate relationship.

Private and Charter Schools

In Arizona, money earmarked for public education is taken out to subsidize private companies.  

  • The funneling of this money is done through companies called STOs.  
  • STOs keep 10% of the money funneled, right off of the top, in addition to whatever other profit they can take.
  • Many politicians personally profit (enormously), to  the tune of millions annual, on these programs.
  • Over $1 billion has been funneled away from public schools since the program began
  • No financial or education-related obligation is attached to this public money

There is a need for public and charter schools, without doubt.  However, when the politicians are profiting as they are, their motives and efficacy of their proposals is suspect, at best.

Corporate Tax Situation

Arizona has aggressively handed out corporate tax exemptions, even built a warehouse for Amazon to entice them to choose Arizona as its new shipping hub.  

  • Large corporations consider a quality public education system as a key component when deciding upon a state for expansion.
    • Amazon passed on Tucson and Phoenix as locations for their second headquarters because of the public education system in Arizona.
  • Corporate tax exemptions in 2017 surpassed the gross revenue collected in Arizona.
  • Corporate tax collections in 2018/19 are expected to be the lowest since 1993/94, despite being a top 10 state in terms of economic growth.
  • In 2018/19, approximately 1.5% of total government revenue will come from corporate tax collection. Utah, a conservative state that also aggressively recruits corporations, will collect nearly 6% of their revenue from corporate tax.  

 

Growth in Arizona

Arizona is growing, faster than the national average.

  • Since 2008, our population has grown by 14%.
  • Number of jobs have grown in Arizona.
  • Arizona’s economy is growing considerably faster than the national average.

Teacher Shortage

In Arizona there is a severe teacher shortage.  The governor’s response has been to ease the qualifications of a teacher.  

  • 49,000 teachers in Arizona
  • Almost 900 teachers left in 2017/18, mid-contract (leaving the profession)
  • 2,000 unfilled teaching positions in 2017/18
  • 3,400 teaching positions filled with unqualified people, despite the ease in qualifications
  • These rates are far beyond any single school district that struggles to find staffing in the United States … and Arizona does that on a state wide level!
  • Teachers leave the profession because they cannot afford to serve as teachers.
  • The teacher salary was a livable wage a decade ago.

Governor Ducey

Governor Doug Ducey has a history of taking money, sometimes illegally, from education.

  • Acting as State Treasurer, under then governor Jan Brewer, Doug Ducey illegally cut funding to Prop 301.
  • A lawsuit was filed against Arizona, naming Doug Ducey as a defendant.  Arizona lost.
  • Governor Ducey proposes Prop 123 and bills it as funding for education.  The proposition passes which means $0.70 for every $1.00 illegally take would be restored.
    • A federal judge ruled that Prop 123 violated the Arizona Constitution
    • The governor repeatedly points to Prop 123 as how generous he has been towards education.
  • Governor Ducey said that teachers would receive no more than a 1% raise in 2018/19.

Education Funding

Since 2008 no other state has received more cuts to public education than Arizona.

  • The budget for public education in Arizona in 2017/18 was $1.1 billion less than a 2007/08.
  • Funding is established on a per-pupil basis.  Funding per-pupil is down 37% since 2008.
  • Over that time the amount of money vouchers have claimed from public education has expanded.  $1 billion has been taken total.

Governor Ducey’s 20×2020 Proposal

Governor Doug Ducey has proposed a 20×2020 plan to increase teacher pay in Arizona.  Let’s take a look.

  • The program is a budget, not legislation.  It is good for one year only, not the three promised.
  • The 10% increase is really a 5.7% increase to education funding (not a bad thing, but not honest).
  • Many schools will receive less than the amount required to increase salaries by 10%.
  • No money considered for support staff, building maintenance, or programs.
  • Is almost $800 million short of restoring recession era cuts as it is advertised.

Take-Away

Arizona has frequently voted in favor of supporting public education. It looks like people will once again need to return to the polls and show their support for education in Arizona.  Maybe this time the politicians will listen.

For more information on what the propositions and ballots are, and who is running for what office, please stay tuned!  Consider signing up for our email list.

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